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Tag: quality of life
02/01/2024

Efficacy of the Mindfulness Meditation Mobile App “Calm” to Reduce Stress Among College Students: Randomized Controlled Trial

Huberty J, Green J, Glissmann C, Larkey L, Puzia M, Lee C. Efficacy of the Mindfulness Meditation Mobile App “Calm” to Reduce Stress Among College Students: Randomized Controlled Trial. JMIR Mhealth Uhealth 2019;7(6):e14273 doi:10.2196/14273

This study examined the sustained stress reduction, mindfulness, and self-compassion in a sample of college students following an 8-week trial of the “Calm” app. Most college students (75%) report elevated stress during the semester, resulting in higher stress levels in this population compared to other age groups. Elevated stress has been associated with a greater likelihood of suicide attempts, which are the second leading cause of death in teens and young adults (ages 15-24). Mindfulness interventions have been offered on college campuses in an effort to reduce students stress levels. The Calm app is a consumer-based mindfulness meditation mobile app. Here, 109 Arizona State University students were randomized to participate in daily meditation facilitated by the Calm app or waitlisted for future access. Most participants (85%) enjoyed the app and continued to use the app for the additional month offered after the study ended. Participants used Calm for an average of 38 minutes/week. After 8 weeks, users displayed lower stress levels than baseline and compared to control participants (p < 0.05). In addition, participants showed increased mindfulness (p < 0.001) and increased self-compassion (p < 0.001) compared to the control group. These beneficial effects of “Calm” guided meditation were maintained through the follow-up period, four weeks after the intervention. This data is encouraging for the future of digital mindfulness interventions to promote stress reduction in college students.

01/18/2024

A Randomized Controlled Study of Remote Computerized Cognitive, Neurofeedback, and Combined Training in the Treatment of Children with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

Luo X, Guo X, Zhao Q, Zhu Y, Chen Y, Zhang D, Jiang H, Wang Y, Johnstone S, Sun L. A randomized controlled study of remote computerized cognitive, neurofeedback, and combined training in the treatment of children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry 2023;32(8):1475-1486. doi:10.1007/s00787-022-01956-1

While medication remains the primary method for improving attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptoms, the development of home-based training tools provides promising support for the future of non-pharmacological care. In this randomized clinical trial three home-based training programs were tested. The first training program was electroencephalogram (EEG) neurofeedback training (NFT) used to adjust brain activity enough to improve attention and daily function. The second training program focused on computerized cognitive training (CCT). In CCT repetitive practice and reinforcement improves specific symptoms for patients. The third training program included training modules from both NFT and CCT programs. Children (84% male, Ages 7-12) were randomly assigned one of these programs NFT (n = 25), CCT (n = 27), or NFT/CCT (n = 28). All training was conducted at home using the Focus Pocus (Neurocognitive Solutions Pty Ltd.) training program. Following baseline assessment training was completed at home for three months (3-5 sessions/week, 14 mini-games/session). Portable Bluetooth devices recorded EEG during each session. In the NFT and NFT/CCT groups the EEG devices provided real-time feedback during high-attention activities. In the CCT program, EEG was recorded but only used to monitor attention levels to accurately provide rewards for high focus. All training programs decreased ADHD symptom severity (measured by AD/HD-RS; p < 0.001). None of the training programs improved symptoms more effectively than the other programs (all p > 0.05). At-home training, regardless of program type, also improved impulsiveness and short-term focus scores (impulsiveness: p = 0.001, short-term focus: p = 0.00). This data provides novel insight into the benefits of home-based NFT and CCT programs.

07/03/2023

Cost-effectiveness of Internet Interventions Compared With Treatment as Usual for People With Mental Disorders: Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

Rohrbach P, Dingemans A, Evers C, Van Furth E, Spinhoven P, Aardoom J, Lähde I, Clemens F, Van den Akker-Van Marle M. Cost-effectiveness of Internet Interventions Compared With Treatment as Usual for People With Mental Disorders: Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials. J Med Internet Res 2023;25:e38204. DOI: 10.2196/38204

A systematic review and meta-analysis were conducted to investigate the cost-effectiveness of internet interventions for mental disorders compared to usual care. Eligibility criteria for included studies were randomized controlled trials with participants who reported any mental health disorder or symptoms, an intervention that was phone- or internet-based, reported outcomes on both quality of life and costs, and published in English. Researchers extracted data to report risk of bias, quality of the economic evaluation, quality-adjusted life years, and costs. The incremental net monetary benefit was calculated and pooled. Thirty-seven studies met eligibility criteria. Overall, the quality of economic evaluations was rated as moderate and the risk of bias as high. Internet interventions were slightly more effective in improving quality of life than usual care (Hedges g=0.052, p=.02) but with similar cost (Hedges g=0.002, p=.96). The pooled incremental net benefit was $255 (95% CI $91 to $419), favoring internet interventions over usual care. This review is a starting point for researchers to further understand the cost-effectiveness of internet interventions for mental disorders. Future work could investigate studies with more homogenous interventions or designs. Additionally, studies from non-Western cultures or low-income countries were not included in this review. To conclude, the cost-effectiveness of internet interventions compared with usual care is likely but not guaranteed.

01/03/2023

Effect of Mobile Phone App–Based Interventions on Quality of Life and Psychological Symptoms Among Adult Cancer Survivors: Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

Qin M, Chen B, Sun S, Liu X.Effect of Mobile Phone App–Based Interventions on Quality of Life and Psychological Symptoms Among Adult Cancer Survivors: Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials. J Med Internet Res 2022;24(12):e39799 DOI: 10.2196/39799

A systematic review and meta-analysis was conducted to investigate the effectiveness of mobile phone app interventions on quality of life (QOL) and psychological outcomes in adult cancer patients. Researchers identified randomized controlled trial studies evaluating apps that targeted adults with cancer and QOL or psychological symptoms. In total, 30 randomized controlled trials with a total of 5,353 patients were included in the meta-analysis. App interventions included health education, physician-patient communication, or data management regarding patient self-monitoring behaviors. On average, interventions were conducted over 2.8 months. Compared with standard care, app interventions significantly improved QOL (Standardized Mean Difference (SMD)=0.39, p<.001) and self-efficacy (SMD=0.15, p=.03) and reduced anxiety (SMD=0.64, p<.001), depression (SMD=-0.33, p=.009), and distress (SMD=-0.34, p=.01) symptoms. Subgroup analyses were also conducted for intervention duration, type of cancer, theoretical approach, treatment category, and intervention delivery (interactive 2-way communication format versus 1-way communication format). Short-term (<3 months) interventions were found to have higher effectiveness compared to longer term interventions for QOL, anxiety and depression. However, given that only 9 studies were longer than 3 months, there is a need for further research on the long-term effects of these app interventions. Apps that included physician-patient communication and that were based on cognitive behavioral therapy were most effective for improving QOL and psychological outcomes. Overall, results provide evidence for the effectiveness of mobile phone app interventions on QOL and psychological outcomes, however caution is needed in the over-interpretation of findings due to high heterogeneity across the studies.

02/14/2020

Remote telepsychiatry workforce: a solution to psychiatry’s workforce issues

Gardner J, Plaven B, Yellowlees P, Shore J. (2020). Remote telepsychiatry workforce: a solution to psychiatry’s workforce issues. Current Psychiatry Reports. 22(2): 8. doi: 10.1007/s11920-020-1128-7

This analytical review explores the feasibility of telepsychiatry (psychiatric assessment and care via live video conference on a webcam-enabled device) to facilitate patient access to care and decrease the pervasive risk of burnout in psychiatrists. Read More

11/15/2019

Prevalence and characterization of yoga mentions in the electronic health record

Penrod N, Lynch S, Thomas S, Seshadri N, Moore J. 2019. Prevalence and characterization of yoga mentions in the electronic health record. The Journal of the American Board of Family Medicine. 32(6): 790-800. doi: 10.3122/jabfm.2019.06.190115

Researchers compared medical records of 30,976 adult patients of Penn Medicine hospital whose electronic health record (EHR)s included a mention of yoga by the patient or provider at a recent health visit with the records of a randomized control cohort (n = 92,919) in a study to characterize clinical documentation of yoga practice and identify medical conditions linked to clinician-recommended yoga intervention at Penn Medicine. Read More

11/08/2019

Avatars and the disease: Digital customization as a resource for self-perception assessment in breast cancer patients

Triberti S, Gorini A, Savioni L, Sebri V, Pravettoni G. (2019). Avatars and the disease: Digital customization as a resource for self-perception assessment in breast cancer patients. Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking. 22(8): 558-564. doi: 10.1089/cyber.2018.0461

Researchers recruited 22 women aged 34-61 from a Milanese oncology clinic who had undergone breast cancer treatment within 3 years and owned an Android mobile device to participate in a pilot exploration of an avatar intervention to assess and promote quality-of-life in chronic illness. Read More

08/04/2017

Technology-mediated interventions and quality of life for persons living with HIV/AIDS: A systematic review.

Cho H, Iribarren S, Schnall R. (2017). Technology-mediated interventions and quality of life for persons living with HIV/AIDS: A systematic review. Applied Clinical Informatics. 8: 348-368. doi: 10.4338/ACI-2016-10-R-0175

Researchers conducted a literature review to evaluate the effect of technology-based interventions on quality of life (QoL) in people living with HIV/AIDS and to examine how QoL was assessed. Read More

06/23/2017

Quality of life as an outcome of opioid use disorder treatment: A systematic review.

Bray JW, Aden B, Eggman AA, et al. (2017). Quality of life as an outcome of opioid use disorder treatment: A systematic review. Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment. 76: 88-93. doi: 10.1016/j.jsat.2017.01.019

There has been a growing push for researchers to evaluate health-related quality-of-life (QoL) and quality adjusted life years (QALYs) as outcomes of opioid use disorder (OUD) treatment. Read More