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Tag: efficacy
02/01/2024

Efficacy of the Mindfulness Meditation Mobile App “Calm” to Reduce Stress Among College Students: Randomized Controlled Trial

Huberty J, Green J, Glissmann C, Larkey L, Puzia M, Lee C. Efficacy of the Mindfulness Meditation Mobile App “Calm” to Reduce Stress Among College Students: Randomized Controlled Trial. JMIR Mhealth Uhealth 2019;7(6):e14273 doi:10.2196/14273

This study examined the sustained stress reduction, mindfulness, and self-compassion in a sample of college students following an 8-week trial of the “Calm” app. Most college students (75%) report elevated stress during the semester, resulting in higher stress levels in this population compared to other age groups. Elevated stress has been associated with a greater likelihood of suicide attempts, which are the second leading cause of death in teens and young adults (ages 15-24). Mindfulness interventions have been offered on college campuses in an effort to reduce students stress levels. The Calm app is a consumer-based mindfulness meditation mobile app. Here, 109 Arizona State University students were randomized to participate in daily meditation facilitated by the Calm app or waitlisted for future access. Most participants (85%) enjoyed the app and continued to use the app for the additional month offered after the study ended. Participants used Calm for an average of 38 minutes/week. After 8 weeks, users displayed lower stress levels than baseline and compared to control participants (p < 0.05). In addition, participants showed increased mindfulness (p < 0.001) and increased self-compassion (p < 0.001) compared to the control group. These beneficial effects of “Calm” guided meditation were maintained through the follow-up period, four weeks after the intervention. This data is encouraging for the future of digital mindfulness interventions to promote stress reduction in college students.

11/08/2022

Clinical Trial to Assess Efficacy of Virtual Alcohol Use Disorder Treatment

Article Excerpt: Over the last 10 years, alcohol use disorder (AUD) has been a significant driver of the drop in life expectancy in the US, with 28.3 million people suffering from the disease in 2020, according to the press release. Among those 26 years and older, the frequency of AUD doubled between 2017 and 2020, rising from 10.6 million to 22.4 million. To help address and treat these conditions, Ria Health announced a partnership with Stanford University at The Liver Meeting to launch a clinical trial using funding from the NIH. In the trial, researchers will examine whether the Ria Health Program can limit problematic drinking and markers related to liver disease. Hosted by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases, The Liver Meeting is the leading national conference for hepatology.

Full Article: https://tinyurl.com/53ds73s6

Article Source: mHealth Intelligence

01/31/2022

Mobile phone-based interventions for mental health: A systematic meta-review of 14 meta-analyses of randomized controlled trials

Goldberg SB, Lam SU, Simonsson O, Torous J, Sun S (2022) Mobile phone-based interventions for mental health: A systematic meta-review of 14 meta-analyses of randomized controlled trials. PLOS Digit Health 1(1): e0000002. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pdig.0000002

Researchers conducted a systematic review of meta-analyses to synthesize evidence for effectiveness of mobile phone-based mental health interventions evaluated in randomized controlled trials. The study aimed to clarify the strength of evidence across different participants, interventions, comparisons, and outcomes. Studies that report an effect size from a meta-analysis related to mobile phone-based interventions, on any mental health outcome, and based on at least four randomized controlled trials were included. The review summarized the results from 14 meta-analyses with a total of 145 randomized controlled trials representing 47,940 participants. Thirty-four effect sizes were identified and evaluated on criteria related to strength of evidence. Eight effect sizes showed promising evidence (n>1000, p<10-6) for mobile apps to improve psychological symptoms and quality of life and text message-based interventions for smoking cessation. Four effect sizes provided suggestive evidence (n>1000, p<10-3), 14 provided weak evidence (n>1000, p<0.05), and eight were non-significant. The magnitude of effects decreased as comparison conditions were more active. Only one study tested moderators as predictors, including study design and aspects of the intervention; however, none significantly impacted treatment effects. Overall, the results indicate that mobile phone-based interventions have potential to promote mental health.

01/19/2022

What Types of Mental Health Apps Actually Work? A Sweeping New Analysis Finds the Data Is Sparse

Article Excerpt: Lisa Marsch, the director of the Dartmouth Center for Technology and Behavioral Health, told STAT that the new meta-review highlights the limitations of existing literature, including that researchers often don’t dig into variables that can impact outcomes and rarely reported adverse effects. She said one of the downsides is that meta-analyses tend to group together interventions that may be quite different from each other, like a mobile app that delivers a “potent therapeutic approach” like cognitive behavioral therapy and another that provides inspirational messages or tips. Each might have different levels of clinical impact.

Full Article: https://tinyurl.com/5n7x6v9x

Article Source: STAT News

07/02/2021

Effectiveness of a web-based tobacco product use prevention videogame intervention on young adolescents’ beliefs and knowledge

Hieftje K, Fernandes C, Lin I, Fiellin L. (2021). Effectiveness of a web-based tobacco product use prevention videogame intervention on young adolescents’ beliefs and knowledge. Substance Abuse. 42(1): 47-53. doi: 10.1080/08897077.2019.1691128

Researchers recruited adolescents (n = 560) age 10–16 years from schools and afterschool programs across the U.S. to participate in a study of the effectiveness of a web-based videogame tobacco prevention intervention, smokeSCREEN. Informed by social cognitive theory and the theory of planned behavior, the intervention facilitates tobacco use prevention in adolescents by increasing knowledge and promoting healthy beliefs around combustible cigarettes, e-cigarettes, vaping, and flavored tobacco product use. smokeSCREEN comprises two mini-games: Refusal Power (players practice refusing peers in risky situations involving tobacco products, with a focus on vaping and JUUL vapes) and Knew Sense (provides tobacco use information, which players practice applying through role-play with a cartoon peer character). Participants accessed smokeSCREEN through a private, password-protected website during school or in an afterschool program. Total game time was one to two hours. Participants completed a survey on knowledge and beliefs about tobacco product use at baseline and post-intervention through a secure website. At post-intervention, participants also answered questions on gameplay experience. Analysis revealed significant increases in the proportions of correct survey answers between baseline and post-intervention for all six questions about knowledge of tobacco product use. Participants also demonstrated significant improvement in the number of correct answers for seven of the eight total questions on beliefs about tobacco product use from baseline to post-intervention. Seventy-six percent of participants reported learning something new from playing smokeSCREEN, 69% enjoyed the game, and 58% would recommend smokeSCREEN to friends. Results suggest that smokeSCREEN has a beneficial effect on participant knowledge and beliefs about tobacco product use and is acceptable to adolescents.

06/19/2020

Clinically meaningful use of mental health apps and its effects on depression: Mixed methods study

Zhang R, Nicholas J, Knapp A, et al. (2019). Clinically meaningful use of mental health apps and its effects on depression: Mixed methods study. Journal of Medical Internet Research. 21(12): e15644. doi: 10.2196/15644

Researchers analyzed a previous randomized controlled trial of 301 adults with elevated symptoms of depression to determine the effect of app use behaviors on depression outcomes. Read More

05/29/2020

Using science to sell apps: Evaluation of mental health app store quality claims

Larsen M, Huckvale K, Nicholas J, et al. (2019). Using science to sell apps: Evaluation of mental health app store quality claims. npj Digital Medicine. 2:18. doi: 10.1038/s41746-019-0093-1

Researchers evaluated 73 top-rated mental health applications (apps) in 5 categories (depression, self-harm, substance use disorders, anxiety disorders, schizophrenia) from the Google Play and iTunes app store to evaluate the nature of app efficacy claims and the strategies used to support these claims. Read More

03/06/2020

Treatment of opioid use disorder in pregnant women via telemedicine: A nonrandomized controlled trial

Guille C, Simpson A, and Douglas E, et al. (2020). Treatment of opioid use disorder in pregnant women via telemedicine a nonrandomized controlled trial. JAMA Network Open. 3(1): e1920177-e1920177. doi: 10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2019.20177.

Researchers recruited 98 pregnant women with opioid use disorder (OUD) from 4 outpatient obstetric practices in a South Carolina reproductive health database to participate in a 15-month prospective, nonrandomized controlled trial that compared maternal and newborn health outcomes between women who received obstetric OUD treatment via telemedicine (n = 44) and women who received in-person OUD treatment (n = 54) in the perinatal–postpartum period. Read More

08/09/2019

Computerized cognitive behavioral therapy for substance use disorders: A summary of the evidence and potential mechanisms of behavior change

Kiluk BD. (2019). Computerized cognitive behavioral therapy for substance use disorders: A summary of the evidence and potential mechanisms of behavior change. Perspectives on Behavior Science. doi: 10.1007/s40614-019-00205-2

The author reviewed studies evaluating the efficacy and potential mechanisms of action of Computer-Based Training for Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT4CBT). Read More