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Tag: students
02/01/2024

Efficacy of the Mindfulness Meditation Mobile App “Calm” to Reduce Stress Among College Students: Randomized Controlled Trial

Huberty J, Green J, Glissmann C, Larkey L, Puzia M, Lee C. Efficacy of the Mindfulness Meditation Mobile App “Calm” to Reduce Stress Among College Students: Randomized Controlled Trial. JMIR Mhealth Uhealth 2019;7(6):e14273 doi:10.2196/14273

This study examined the sustained stress reduction, mindfulness, and self-compassion in a sample of college students following an 8-week trial of the “Calm” app. Most college students (75%) report elevated stress during the semester, resulting in higher stress levels in this population compared to other age groups. Elevated stress has been associated with a greater likelihood of suicide attempts, which are the second leading cause of death in teens and young adults (ages 15-24). Mindfulness interventions have been offered on college campuses in an effort to reduce students stress levels. The Calm app is a consumer-based mindfulness meditation mobile app. Here, 109 Arizona State University students were randomized to participate in daily meditation facilitated by the Calm app or waitlisted for future access. Most participants (85%) enjoyed the app and continued to use the app for the additional month offered after the study ended. Participants used Calm for an average of 38 minutes/week. After 8 weeks, users displayed lower stress levels than baseline and compared to control participants (p < 0.05). In addition, participants showed increased mindfulness (p < 0.001) and increased self-compassion (p < 0.001) compared to the control group. These beneficial effects of “Calm” guided meditation were maintained through the follow-up period, four weeks after the intervention. This data is encouraging for the future of digital mindfulness interventions to promote stress reduction in college students.

01/30/2024

4 High-Tech Approaches That Could Mitigate Suicide Risks

Article Excerpt: Can evidence-based technology help identify and mitigate suicide risk? And if high-tech solutions have the research to support their value, what is the best way to get these tools into practice? Researchers, technology developers and mental health leaders hope to find out soon. Under a five-year, $17 million grant from the National Institute of Mental Health, the Center for Accelerating Practices to End Suicide through Technology Translation (CAPES) initially will focus on four technology projects. CAPES includes a network of organizations working with UMass Chan Medical School, including UMass Memorial Health, UMass Lowell and UMass Amherst, Worcester Polytechnic Institute, Zero Suicide Institute and more than 100 other collaborating institutions.

Full Article: http://tinyurl.com/3ezzvdv8

Article Source: American Hospital Association

11/25/2023

AI Can Help to Flag Students Struggling with Mental Health

Article Excerpt: Even pre-pandemic, mental health issues were plaguing higher education. Perhaps it’s unsurprising that only 12% of students think their university handles the issue of mental health well. With the situation still ongoing, easier, timely access to effective mental health services has never been more important. Now, with the assistance of artificial intelligence and data intelligence, this is possible. Location services, powered by network automation, can offer important student data and insights to pre-emptively flag when an individual might be experiencing mental distress. With the help of AI-driven technology, universities can quickly identify withdrawn behaviour – often a tell-tale sign of mental unwellness. If a student is spending most of their time confined to their accommodation, or continuously missing lessons, location services will pick it up. By leveraging this data, universities can then offer early intervention, whether from counsellors or mental health support teams.

Full Article: https://tinyurl.com/mp67t759

Article Source: University World News

11/01/2023

From Ideas to Impact: Symposium on Digital Therapeutics

Article Excerpt: The Clinically-Validated Digital Therapeutics: Innovations in Scientific Discovery, Clinical Applications, and Global Deployment event convened health care leaders across academia, government, and industry at the Hanover Inn on Oct. 25. Hosted by the Center for Technology and Behavioral Health, the digital heath summit, now in its second edition, is the only one of its kind situated in an academic institution. Besides clinical and computer science researchers, it brings together diverse stakeholders—providers, regulators, payers, and investors, as well as representatives from global pharma—to create pathways for translating ideas in the space of digital health to impact. In her welcoming remarks at the event President Sian Leah Beilock emphasized the urgency in realizing the potential of digital health in tackling mental health issues and other areas of health care.

Full Article: https://tinyurl.com/ms3swwv3

Article Source: Dartmouth News

10/25/2023

Digital Mental Health Research Wins Distinguished Paper Award

Article Excerpt: Co-authors Andrew Campbell, professor of computer science, HealthX Lab graduate students Subigya Nepal and Weichen Wang, and Jeremy Huckins, Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences won a Distinguished Paper Award at the 2023 ACM UbiComp Conference for their paper titled “GLOBEM: Cross-Dataset Generalization of Longitudinal Human Behavior Modeling.” Eight out of 210 papers received the Distinguished Paper Award, presented at UbiComp and published in Proceedings of the ACM on Interactive, Mobile, Wearable and Ubiquitous Technologies (Volume 6).

Full Article: https://tinyurl.com/4h4xcrsf

Article Source: Dartmouth Computer Science News

09/21/2023

Technology Fueled America’s Youth Mental Health Crisis, But It Can Help End It

Article Excerpt: Sian Leah Beilock is a cognitive scientist who is the new president of Dartmouth College, the first woman to hold that position since the school was founded in 1769. An expert in, among other things, the effect of stress on academic performance, she is starting her tenure by putting health and wellness at the center of her leadership agenda with a focus on the country’s youth mental health crisis…Substance abuse, which is both helping drive the mental health crisis and is drastically undertreated with nearly 90 percent of sufferers going without treatment, offers an example of the power of technology to provide clinical care in underserved areas or in cases in which stigmatization prevents people from seeking the help they need. Lisa Marsch and her team at the Dartmouth Center for Technology and Behavioral Health (CBTH) created and validated the first Food and Drug Administration-cleared digital therapeutic for the treatment of opioid addiction, which provides cognitive behavioral therapy interventions though the user’s digital device and has since helped roughly double rates of abstinence by lowering the threshold for access to treatment.

Full Article: https://tinyurl.com/4v4jkrwd

Article Source: The Washington Post

09/19/2023

Symposium Focuses on Digital Tech for Mental Health

Article Excerpt: Technology offers new avenues for mental health delivery. Digital record keeping, virtual consultations, wearables that monitor activity and well-being, mindfulness apps, and AI-based chatbots are just a few examples. But these advances have not been leveraged effectively enough, Cornell Tech Professor and HealthRhythms Co-Founder Tanzeem Choudhury said in a keynote talk Tuesday at the Digital Mental Health and AI Symposium organized by the Center for Technology and Behavioral Health. Choudhury explored the challenges that have forestalled digital mental health from delivering on some of its early promises and how to move the needle forward.

Full Article: https://tinyurl.com/ysvssb4s

Article Source: Dartmouth News

09/08/2023

Symposium to Spotlight Digital Mental Health Technology

Article Excerpt: Experts in the field of digital mental health will gather at Dartmouth on Sept. 19 to discuss opportunities and challenges in developing innovative digital tools that can transform mental health care. President Sian Leah Beilock will deliver opening remarks to kick off the Digital Mental Health & AI Symposium organized by the Center for Technology and Behavioral Health at the Hanover Inn. “The Center for Technology and Behavioral Health is a leader in the science of digital health as applied to health behavior,” says CTBH Director Lisa Marsch. “We are excited to host this event with the Dartmouth community to highlight the opportunities for using digital health tools to promote mental health anytime and anywhere.”

Full Article: https://tinyurl.com/2kjjkb6t

Article Source: Dartmouth News

01/10/2023

Challenges in Recruiting University Students for Web-Based Indicated Prevention of Depression and Anxiety: Results From a Randomized Controlled Trial (ICare Prevent)

Bolinski F, Kleiboer A, Neijenhuijs K, Karyotaki E, Wiers R, de Koning L, Jacobi C, Zarski A, Weisel K, Cuijpers P, Riper H. Challenges in Recruiting University Students for Web-Based Indicated Prevention of Depression and Anxiety: Results From a Randomized Controlled Trial (ICare Prevent). J Med Internet Res 2022;24(12):e40892. DOI: 10.2196/40892

This study described recruitment challenges for a transdiagnostic, web-based prevention program and presented initial analysis on the intervention’s effectiveness on depression and anxiety symptoms. The study was a 3-arm randomized controlled trial with students (at least 16 years old) with subclinical symptoms of depression and anxiety to compare individually guided and automatically guided versions of ICare Prevent versus care as usual. ICare Prevent is a web-based and mobile-supported intervention for prevention of depression and anxiety. ICare Prevent is a 7-session web-based program (45-60 minutes each) and participants were instructed to complete 1-2 sessions weekly. ICare Prevent also provides elective modules and diaries that target factors common to mood and anxiety problems (i.e., sleep, alcohol use, positive activities). The individually guided version provided structured and personalized feedback on exercises and the automatically guided version provided standard and computerized feedback after each session. The study’s original recruitment goal was 252 student participants. Various strategies of recruitment were used, including social media campaigns on Facebook and Instagram, printed advertising at universities, paid participant platform, and other collaborations. Direct recruitment using students’ email addresses via the student administration was the most effective strategy. Despite these strategies, data was available for only 35 participants (individually guided: n=14, automatically guided: n=8, care as usual: n=13). Participants provided self-reported depression and anxiety symptoms at baseline, 6-month, and 12-month follow-up. Log data from the intervention platform showed low usage, with an average of 3 out of 7 sessions completed. Results did not show sufficient evidence of intervention effects on depression and anxiety over time in any intervention arm. Overall, recruitment for this population was challenging and more research is needed to identify factors to better engage college students in research studies.