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Tag: acceptability
04/10/2023

Combined Laboratory and Field Test of a Smartphone Breath Alcohol Device and Blood Alcohol Concentration Estimator to Facilitate Moderate Drinking Among Young Adults

Leeman RF, Berey BL, Frohe T, Rowland BHP, Martens MP, Fucito LM, Stellefson M, Nixon SJ, & O’Malley SS. (2022). A combined laboratory and field test of a smartphone breath alcohol device and blood alcohol concentration estimator to facilitate moderate drinking among young adults. Psychology of Addictive Behaviors, 36(6), 710–723. https://doi.org/10.1037/adb0000780

This paper evaluated feasibility, usability, acceptability, and efficacy of blood alcohol content (BAC) related moderate drinking technology during a laboratory alcohol self-administration session and follow-up field test in real-world situations. Participants were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 technologies to use during a laboratory alcohol drinking session: (1) breathalyzer alcohol device connected to an app, (2) BAC estimator app where participants make entries about drinking behavior, and (3) a self-texting control condition where participants send a text after each alcoholic drink consumed. All participants completed a laboratory alcohol-drinking session while using the assigned technology procedure. After this session, participants were instructed to use all three forms of technologies for two weeks. At the end of the field-testing period, acceptability, usability, and perspectives on all three technologies were The breathalyzer and BAC estimator app both had favorable acceptability and usability ratings. Participants used at least one form of technology on 67% of drinking days. Based on self-reported data, as also significantly lower during the field-test period than at baseline. Overall, combining lab and field methods to test drinking technologies was feasible among young adults. Results support the potential of mobile interventions to help young adults in motivating behavior change given their willingness to use apps.

04/03/2023

I-CARE: Feasibility, Acceptability, and Appropriateness of a Digital Health Intervention for Youth Experiencing Mental Health Boarding

Leyenaar JK, Arakelyan M, Acquilano SC, Gilbert TL, Craig JT, Lee CN, Kodak SG, Ignatova E, Mudge LA, House SA, Brady RE. I-CARE: Feasibility, Acceptability, and Appropriateness of a Digital Health Intervention for Youth Experiencing Mental Health Boarding. J Adolesc Health. 2023 Mar 2:S1054-139X(23)00062-9. doi: 10.1016/j.jadohealth.2023.01.015. Epub ahead of print. PMID: 36870901.

A modular digital intervention was developed to facilitate delivery of evidence-based psychosocial skills by non-mental health clinicians for youth with expressed suicidality. The paper describes pilot mixed method findings on the intervention’s effectiveness, feasibility, acceptability, and appropriateness. The intervention, I-CARE, consisted of seven modules grounded in cognitive behavior therapy and were delivered via a table computer with videos and practice activities. Licensed nursing assistants provided one-on-one supervision and facilitated the intervention. I-CARE was implemented in a pediatric hospital with 24 patients aged 12-17 years hospitalized due to suicidal ideation or attempt. Clinical outcomes were assessed by self-reported surveys at hospital admission and 24 hours before hospital discharge. Emotional distress significantly decreased after participation (6.3 points on 63-point scale). There were no significant changes in engagement readiness and illness severity. Majority of youth, caregivers and clinicians rated I-CARE as feasible (98%, N=39), acceptable (90%, N=36), and appropriate (78%, N=31). Overall, I-CARE was feasible to implement and acceptable to end-users and demonstrated preliminary positive impact on emotional distress for suicidal young people in psychiatric hospitalization.

 

03/13/2023

Supporting people affected by problematic alcohol, substance use and other behaviours under pandemic conditions: A pragmatic evaluation of how SMART recovery Australia responded to COVID-19

Beck AK, Larance B, Baker AL, Deane FP, Manning V, Hides L, & Kelly PJ. (2023). Supporting people affected by problematic alcohol, substance use and other behaviours under pandemic conditions: A pragmatic evaluation of how SMART recovery Australia responded to COVID-19. Addictive Behaviors, 139, 107577–107577. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.addbeh.2022.107577

Researchers conducted a pragmatic evaluation of the scaling up of online, group-based addiction services during the COVID-19 pandemic. The RE-AIM framework (Reach, Effectiveness, Adoption, Implementation, Maintenance) was applied to analyze the SMART Recovery Australia (SRAU) online program for 12 months and at 2-month follow-up. SRAU is a mutual-help program based on a four-point curriculum (building motivation, coping with urges, problem solving, and lifestyle balance) and led by a trained facilitator via Zoom. Before the pandemic, there were only 6 online groups and SRAU aimed to expand this service during the pandemic by developing 100 groups. Data was collected by online self-report participant surveys, Zoom data analytics on meetings and attendees, and administrative logs of third-party providers. During the 12-month evaluation period, the number of online groups increased from 6 to 132. A total of 2786 meetings were delivered with 41,752 attendees. Participant survey results (N=1052) showed that 91% of participants were highly engaged and 92% had positive experiences with the online group meetings. Further, 91% of participants who had experienced the in-person format rated their online experience as equivalent or better. However, 21% reported technical difficulties. The average number of meetings delivered and number of attendees per month were sustained at the two-month follow-up. Overall, SRAU achieved the goal of establishing at least 100 online mutual-help groups in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. Results support the acceptability and sustainability of delivering groups online for substance use behaviors.

01/30/2023

Feasibility and acceptability of using smartphone-based EMA to assess patterns of prescription opioid and medical cannabis use among individuals with chronic pain

Anderson Goodell EM, Nordeck C, Finan PH, Vandrey R, Dunn KE, & Thrul J. (2021). Feasibility and acceptability of using smartphone-based EMA to assess patterns of prescription opioid and medical cannabis use among individuals with chronic pain. Internet Interventions: the Application of Information Technology in Mental and Behavioural Health, 26, 100460–100460. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.invent.2021.100460

This paper described the feasibility and acceptability of a smartphone-based Ecological Momentary Assessment (EMA) data collection tool among people who use multiple substances and suffer from chronic pain. Forty-six participants were recruited through targeted Facebook and Instagram advertisements and completed screening via the link in the ads. Eligible participants had an opioid medication prescription, current opioid use, a pain disorder, and a referral for medical cannabis. Participants completed prompted EMA surveys on a mobile app for 30 days. Surveys included questions about opioid medication use, medical cannabis use, and pain symptoms. Participants were prompted to respond to four randomly timed surveys (assessing the past hour) and one daily diary per day. A subsample of 10 participants completed qualitative interviews. On average, participants responded to 70% of past-hour surveys and 92% of daily diaries. During qualitative interviews, participants reported an overall positive experience, but identified some issues related to smartphone notifications, redundant questions, or being prompted to complete assessments when they do not feel well. Findings demonstrate the feasibility and general acceptability of using this methodology for examining patterns of medical cannabis and prescription opioid medication use among individuals with chronic pain. Engagement with the digital tool over the 30-day duration was comparable to previous work. This study has implications for informing larger-scale epidemiology studies, interventions, and assessments on a wider geographic scale.

10/31/2022

Parent-Based Prevention of Bullying and Cyberbullying During COVID-19 Social Distancing: A Pilot Intervention using the MOST Framework

Doty J, Gabrielli J, Abraczinskas M, Giron K, Yourell J, Stormshak E. Parent-Based Prevention of Bullying and Cyberbullying During COVID-19 Social Distancing: A Pilot Intervention using the MOST Framework. J of Prevention 43, 719–734 (2022). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10935-022-00696-x

This pilot study investigated satisfaction and acceptability of an evidence-based parenting intervention enhanced to address bullying and cyberbullying. The Everyday Parenting intervention focuses on content on positive reinforcement, monitoring daily activities, setting limits, negotiation, and positive parenting. This program was enhanced with intensive role playing, social emotional coaching, and media parenting components. The pilot was delivered via video teleconferencing during the COVID-19 pandemic. Thirty-two parents (88% female) with children ages 9-12 years old participated in weekly online 60-minute sessions for 8 weeks. Eligibility for free- or reduced-price lunch was met by 56% of participants. Thirty of the parents completed all the sessions. Researchers examined participant satisfaction and qualitative analyses to explain outcomes and explore participant acceptability. Average satisfaction with individual sessions was high (3.93 on 4-point scale). Qualitative findings reinforced and explained quantitative findings. Participants found the intervention and virtual delivery acceptable and gave feedback to strengthen the focus on bullying and cyberbullying topics. There were non-significant differences in satisfaction and delivery in families eligible for free- or reduced-priced lunch. Overall, parents found the enhancements to Everyday Parenting program acceptable. It was also feasible to deliver the program through video conferencing with parents. The increase in technology engagement due to the COVID-19 pandemic will potentially increase the importance of online safety for children.

06/20/2022

Feedback on Instagram posts for a gestational weight gain intervention

Waring ME, Pagoto SL, Moore Simas TA, Heersping G, Rudin LR, Arcangel K. Feedback on Instagram posts for a gestational weight gain intervention [published correction appears in Transl Behav Med. 2022 Apr 22;:]. Transl Behav Med. 2022;12(4):568-575. doi:10.1093/tbm/ibac001

Researchers evaluated the feasibility and acceptability of a private Instagram group and lifestyle intervention posts focused on healthy gestational weight gain. A study was conducted with pregnant women with pre-pregnancy overweight or obesity who use Instagram regularly. Eleven participants each created a private Instagram account and followed the other participants’ accounts and a moderator. The moderator, a registered dietitian, uploaded posts twice a day for 2 weeks about physical activity, healthy eating, goal setting and progress reports during pregnancy. Participants were encouraged to check the group daily and engage by liking, replying to comments, and posting their own photos. After the 2-week intervention, participants completed an online survey on acceptability of the Instagram posts developed by the researchers and participated in virtual focus group interviews via Webex. User engagement data was collected from Instagram. The results indicated all participants followed the moderator’s account and engaged with all study posts. Most participants (82%) reported feeling comfortable sharing in the group and 73% would participate in a similar group in the future. A majority of participants found the posts visually attractive and indicated that the posts provided helpful information. However, participants preferred more personalized content and felt hesitant to post their own photos because they did not feel their photos were high-quality and positive enough. Overall, the study demonstrated that creating a private Instagram group for delivery of a dietary and fitness intervention is feasible. Findings can inform next steps in development and future research developing Instagram-delivered interventions for other health behaviors or conditions.

05/30/2022

Telephone and Web-Based Delivery of Healthy Eating and Active Living Interventions for Parents of Children Aged 2 to 6 Years: Mixed Methods Process Evaluation of the Time for Healthy Habits Translation Trial

Hammersley M, Wyse R, Jones R, Okely A, Wolfenden L, Eckermann S, Xu J, Green A, Stacey F, Yoong S, Jackson J, Innes-Hughes C, Li V, Rissel C. Telephone and Web-Based Delivery of Healthy Eating and Active Living Interventions for Parents of Children Aged 2 to 6 Years: Mixed Methods Process Evaluation of the Time for Healthy Habits Translation Trial. J Med Internet Res 2022;24(5):e35771 DOI: 10.2196/35771

Researchers conducted a mixed methods process evaluation of a translational trial targeting the dietary habits and movement behaviors of children with 3 partially randomized arms. The Time for Healthy Habits study recruited 458 total parents of children aged 2 to 6 years. The three arms were a telephone intervention, a web-based app intervention, and an active control (written education materials). At baseline, participants were asked to indicate their preferred intervention delivery method (telephone, web, written) or if they preferred to be randomized to condition. Participants received the assigned intervention for 12 weeks. Intervention acceptability and process evaluation were assessed at 3 months post baseline using a questionnaire developed by the researchers and qualitative interviews. Data on intervention fidelity and study attrition were also collected. Thirty participants completed the qualitative interviews, and 144 (31.4%) participants completed the postintervention follow-up. Most participants preferred the web-based delivery method at baseline. Results demonstrated high acceptability of the web-based and telephone interventions. Participants reported the healthy eating content to be the most useful component of the web-based modules and telephone calls. A significantly higher proportion of participants completed the telephone intervention compared to the web-based intervention. However, study attrition was higher in the telephone intervention arm. Overall, the process evaluation showed high acceptability of all interventions, but significantly more participants preferred the web-based intervention and were retained in the study relative to the other arms. This study highlighted the strengths and weaknesses of remotely delivered interventions and can inform directions for policy makers and practitioners.

05/09/2022

FOCUS mHealth Intervention for Veterans with Serious Mental Illness in an Outpatient Department of Veterans Affairs Setting: Feasibility, Acceptability, and Usability Study

Buck B, Nguyen J, Porter S, Ben-Zeev D, Reger GM. FOCUS mHealth Intervention for Veterans With Serious Mental Illness in an Outpatient Department of Veterans Affairs Setting: Feasibility, Acceptability, and Usability Study. JMIR Ment Health 2022;9(1):e26049. doi: 10.2196/26049

This study evaluates the feasibility, acceptability, and preliminary effectiveness of a mobile health intervention for veterans with serious mental illnesses (SMIs) in a VA outpatient care. Seventeen veterans with SMIs participated in a one-month pilot trial of FOCUS. FOCUS consists of a mobile app, a clinician dashboard, and a mHealth support specialist. The app provides brief self-management interventions based on the user’s responses to an ecological momentary assessment (EMA). Interventions include strategies to cope with auditory hallucinations, mood, sleep, social functioning, and medication use. A mHealth support specialist tracks and gives technical support for participants’ use of FOCUS. The specialist also gives weekly updates to the mental health treatment team on each veteran’s use of FOCUS and reported symptoms and functioning. Researchers collected data on mental health symptoms and functional recovery, as well as qualitative feedback on the acceptability of FOCUS. On average, participants completed 85 EMAs and used FOCUS on 19.29 out of 30 access days. Overall, participants reported the intervention as highly acceptable; 94% would recommend FOCUS to a friend, and 88% felt satisfied. Based on qualitative interviews, participants found FOCUS complements their VA services and suggested possible subgroups to target (i.e., combat veterans). During the pilot, participants reported statistically non-significant improvements in recovery, auditory hallucinations, and quality of life. The study administered surveys to clinicians who had patients participating in FOCUS to assess feasibility and acceptability. Based on this data, clinicians found the mHealth updates useful for informing their care. FOCUS appears to be feasible, acceptable, and useful for veterans with SMIs; future research could examine specific implementation strategies in the VA, as well as replicate the effectiveness of FOCUS with a larger sample.

04/25/2022

Preventive Digital Mental Health for Children in Primary Schools: Acceptability and Feasibility Study

Davies SM, Jardine J, Gutridge K, Bernard Z, Park S, Dawson T, Abel KM, Whelan P. Preventive Digital Mental Health for Children in Primary Schools: Acceptability and Feasibility Study. JMIR Form Res 2021;5(12):e30668. doi: 10.2196/30668

A study tested the feasibility of integrating a low-cost, scalable, and innovative digital mental health intervention in schools in the Greater Manchester area in the United Kingdom. Researchers piloted a digital intervention consisting of two components: (1) Lexplore, a reading assessment using eye-tracking technology to assess reading ability and identify any atypicality, and (2) Lincus, a web-based platform for emotional, social, and physical well-being measures wellbeing for monitoring and includes customized child-relevant information, local resources, and links. The intervention was implemented at a primary school for 6 weeks and all children were eligible for the study. During the 6-week period, Lexplore assessments were conducted twice in each school and participants were asked to spend about 5 minutes during free time every morning to complete surveys on the Lincus platform. Students, parents, and teachers also provided qualitative feedback about the digital platforms at group workshops or appointments. Results demonstrated that 88% of students completed both the initial and follow-up assessments for Lexplore and on average, approximately 1 Lincus survey per user per week was recorded. Overall, children and teachers found the digital intervention engaging, usable, and acceptable. However, there were some important barriers identified: log-in difficulties, incorporating the Lincus and Lexplore assessments into routines, availability of tablets across classes, and poor parental engagement. Overall, the intervention was well-received, and the study identified barriers and facilitators which will inform future research in this setting.