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Tag: social media
11/17/2017

Big Data From Social Media Helps Combat Prescription Drug Crisis

Article Excerpt: Researchers at Dartmouth, Stanford University, and IBM Research, conducted a critical review of existing literature to determine whether social media big data can be used to understand communication and behavioral patterns related to prescription drug abuse. Their study found that with proper research methods and attention to privacy and ethical issues, social media big data can reveal important information concerning drug abuse, such as user-reported side effects, drug cravings, emotional states, and risky behaviors.

Full Article: https://tinyurl.com/yay748w9

Article Source: Technology Networks

11/16/2017

Using Social Media Big Data to Combat Prescription Drug Crisis

Article Excerpt: Researchers at Dartmouth, Stanford University, and IBM Research, conducted a critical review of existing literature to determine whether social media big data can be used to understand communication and behavioral patterns related to prescription drug abuse. Their study found that with proper research methods and attention to privacy and ethical issues, social media big data can reveal important information concerning drug abuse, such as user-reported side effects, drug cravings, emotional states, and risky behaviors.

Full Article: https://tinyurl.com/ycyhjoq4

Article Source: Geisel NewCenter

10/20/2017

Tweet for behavior change: Using social media for the dissemination of public health messages.

Gough A, Barrett RF, Ajao O, et al. (2017). Tweet for behavior change: Using social media for the dissemination of public health messages. JMIR Public Health and Surveillance. 3(1): e14. doi: 10.2196/publichealth.6313

Researchers examined the reach and engagement achieved by a two-phase public health Twitter campaign. Read More

10/06/2017

Epidemiology from tweets: Estimating misuse of prescription opioids in the USA from social media.

Chary M, Genes N, Giraud-Carrier C, Hanson C, Nelson LS, Manini AF. 2017. Epidemiology from tweets: estimating misuse of prescription opioids in the USA from social media. Journal of Medical Toxicology. doi: 10.1007/s13181-017-0625-5

Researchers compared use of language related to misuse of prescription opioids in tweets made between 2012, 2013, and 2014 and results from the National Surveys on Drug Usage and Health (NSDUH) for those years to evaluate Twitter activity as an epidemiological tool for estimating geographical variations in misuse of prescription opioids. Read More

08/11/2017

How do you #relax when you’re #stressed? A content analysis and infodemiology study of stress-related tweets.

Doan S, Ritchart A, Perry N, Chaparro JD, Conway M. (2017). How do you #relax when you’re #stressed? A content analysis and infodemiology study of stress-related tweets. JMIR Public Health and Surveillance. 3(1): e35. doi: 10.2196/publichealth.5939

Researchers examined how Twitter users discussed stress and relaxation on social media by aggregating and thematically analyzing tweets containing stress and relaxation related hashtags. Read More

07/28/2017

Attitudes towards the ethics of research using social media: A systematic review.

Golder S, Ahmed S, Norman G, Booth A. (2017). Attitudes towards the ethics of research using social media: A systematic review. Journal of Medical Internet Research. 19(6): e195. doi: 10.2196/jmir.7082

Researchers reviewed 17 studies using any qualitative, quantitative, or mixed-methods methodology that included qualitative data on attitudes towards research using social media. Read More

04/18/2017

The Recovering Heroin Addict Shaking Social Media

Article Excerpt: Today, more than 22 million people are struggling with addiction, and it’s estimated that as a result, more than 45 million people are affected. But what many people don’t realize is that there are more than 23 million people living in active, long-term recovery today. Yet, because of shame and stigma, many stay silent.

Full Article: http://tinyurl.com/nydm8vt

Article Source: Forbes

03/27/2017

Social Media Influencers Finally Come to … Medicine

Article Excerpt: Just as Snapchat and Instagram and YouTube have influencers, so too does medicine. Chronic diseases occupy an online world of memes, hashtags (#hospitalglam), and people who provide information and insights to communities that too often feel they have no voice. A growing number of companies are hiring these patient influencers to reach, and understand, these folks. And, of course, sell them stuff.

Full Article: http://tinyurl.com/mx5ahn2

Article Source: WIRED

03/17/2017

Latino adults’ perspectives on treating tobacco use via social media.

Anguiano B, Brown-Johnson C, Rosas LG, Pechmann C, Prochaska JJ. (2017). Latino adults’ perspectives on treating tobacco use via social media. JMIR Mhealth and Uhealth. 5(2): e12. doi: 10.2196/mhealth.6684

Researchers recruited 32 people who identify as Latino or Latina using Craigslist, referrals by community health workers, and word of mouth to participate in focus groups about mobile phone and social media use, smoking, and cessation treatment preferences. All participants had made at least one 24 hour quit attempt, but very few had reported receiving assistance from a health care provider (n=3) or using nicotine replacement (n=1), and no participants had used cessation medication or psychosocial cessation treatments. One factor that helped participants delay smoking was checking Facebook. Key motivators for quitting smoking were family, life transitions (e.g. pregnancy), and feelings of shame. Participants used many popular social media platforms, but preferred Facebook. Social media was acceptable to participants as a method to deliver smoking cessation interventions. Those opposed to social media smoking cessation groups preferred receiving support from family and friends and did not want to spend more time on their phone. There were mixed perspectives about whether social media groups should be matched and how they should be matched (e.g. race, smoking characteristics, interests). Participants felt that supportive messages posted as a part of social media smoking cessation interventions should be supportive and motivational, but not demanding.